At the start of a new academic year, many teachers  look for decorative and informative posters for  the classroom.  Here are  a few suggestions.

American Physical Society

“Top 10 Reasons Why You Should Take Physics”

http://www.aps.org/programs/education/images/whyphysics.jpg

“Celebrate Women in Physics”

http://www.aps.org/programs/women/reports/poster.cfm

“Accelerate Your Mind”

“PhysicsCentral”

“Minorities in Physics”

http://www.aps.org/programs/outreach/posters.cfm

Tassia Owen, Public Outreach Specialist for APS,  will send posters to those who email her at physicscentral @aps.org.  To preview the posters go to:  http://www.physicscentral.com/posters.cfm

Physics teacher Tony  Mangiacapre offers these resources for beginning the year (includes free physics clip art):http://www.stmary.ws/highschool/physics/home/great_free_stuff.htm

Physics teacher Brendan Noon offers this wisdom: When it comes to getting free posters, all you need to do is think about what images you want depicted and which government agency might be responsible for this information. Once you’ve determined that send an email telling them that you are  a poor educator looking to inspire students about that agencies purpose!

OSA Posters: http://www.osa-foundation.org/programs/resources/posters 

LaserFest: http://laserfest.org/about/materials.cfm

Fermilab has some free posters: http://eddata.fnal.gov/lasso/ffse_store/category.lasso?category=posters

These posters are not free, but have a modest price tag.

Looking for astrophysics posters try JPL: http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/education/index.cfm?page=86

Metric (SI) Resources are available for educators and children. These resources enrich the classroom curriculum and reinforce student learning. Links on this “Everyday Life” resource connect you to free and inexpensive materials suitable for different age groups. Contact: TheSI@nist.gov.

EOS http://eospso.gsfc.nasa.gov/eos_homepage/for_educators/educational_publications.php

or  NOAA http://www.weather.gov/om/edures.shtml

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